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Now displaying: June, 2018
Jun 25, 2018

This week, we recorded in front of a live audience at Porcfest!

Featuring Hosts: Matt Carano, Tom Hudson, and Nick Boyle

Engineered by: Matt Carano

Produced by: Tom Hudson, Matt Carano, and Nick Boyle

News

Events

  • Freecoast Liberty Outreach Meetup
    • Rochester - 4th Thursday

 

Special Segment - Autocrat of the Week

  • John W. Weeks - dead (April 11, 1860 – July 12, 1926), but affecting NH to this very day.

 

NH History

  • Coös County
    • Originally part of Grafton County, Coös was the first county created after US Independence in 1803.
    • The population at that time was only 3,000 people
    • Coös is an Abenaki term for “dwellers in the pine tree place”or “small pines”
    • Coös has 20% of NH’s land area but only 2.3% of its population at 33,055 at the 2010 census.
    • To compare, Derry, NH’s fourth largest town had 33,255 at the 2010 census
    • In the 19th Century logging, pulp and paper were some of the main industries especially in Berlin, which was home to the Brown Paper Company, which actually invented the modern tape measure in 1922.
    • By the early 1900’s tourism was a booming industry, with grand hotels opening such as The Balsam’s in Dixville Notch, home of the first in the nation vote. The Mt. Washington Hotel in Bretton Woods, home of the Bretton Woods Conference we talked about in a previous episode. Mountain View Grand in Whitefield which has a great view of the Presidential Range in the White Mountains. Tourism is the biggest industry to this day
    • Coös County is one of the most consistent bellwether counties in the nation, having supported the president-elect in every election since 1892 besides 1968 and 2004.
    • Makes up the vast majority of NH’s unincorporated places which are townships that have no government and are usually unpopulated year round. (23, rest of NH 2)
    • No, you can’t get away with murder there. The County runs the place with either neighboring towns or state police providing the police force. Day to day stuff like trash collection plowing etc homeowners pay to the nearest town voluntarily. There’s no property tax in unincorporated places
    • Before you think about buying property, though, some of the unincorporated places are in the White Mountain National Forest which is unfortunately owned by the Feds, or in State owned parks. Which means building a home isn’t allowed in those places.
    • http://www.cooscountynh.us/county-info/pages/history http://nhpr.org/post/you-asked-we-answered-can-you-get-away-murder-nhs-unincorporated-towns#stream/0

 

Suggestions/Feedback

Do you have a topic that you would like for us to discuss? A correction and additional piece of information that we may have overlooked, please send it in to freecastpodcast@gmail.com While you are here, follow us on Twitter @freecastpodcast and like our Facebook page.

Jun 6, 2018

This week we discuss checkpoints (again!), eminent domain, ranked-choice elections, Exeter Police charge a man for criticizing the police chief, cake wars, and in the history segment, NH Death Penalty.

 

News

Events

  • Freecoast Liberty Outreach Meetup
    • Dover - 1st Thursday 6/7
    • Exeter - 2nd Thursday 6/14
  • Freecoast Festival (festival.freecoast.org)
    • Sept 7th through the 9th in Portsmouth, NH
    • Tickets on sale now!
    • Large Dash Prize
  • Porcfest

 

Special Segment - Autocrat of the Week

  • Lincoln Soldati
  • Bill Shupe Exeter police chief

 

NH History

  • History of the Death Penalty in NH

    Famous capital cases

    Ruth Blay, executed in 1768, was the last woman executed in New Hampshire.  She was accused of allegedly killing her stillborn child - a crime that she was exonerated of shortly after her execution.  A play was made about her death and a popular song recognizing her innocence was sung locally in the Portsmouth area for many years.  

    Thomas Powers was executed in 1796 for rape.  He was the only African American man ever executed in New Hampshire and the only person ever executed in NH for a crime other than murder.

    Past milestones in abolition/reinstatement

    New Hampshire has executed 26 people in its history.  The last execution was in 1939.

    Howard Long was put to death in July of 1939.  The rope used to hang him is still retained on display in the Belknap County Sheriff's office.

    A bill to abolish the death penalty was passed by the House and Senate in 2000.  The bills were vetoed by Governor Jeanne Shaheen.

    In 2004, as part of a national campaign to end the death penalty for juvenile offenders, a bill banning the execution of those convicted of killing while under the age of 18 passed the House and Senate.  It was vetoed by Governor Craig Benson. The next year the same bill was reintroduced and passed again. It was signed by Governor John Lynch.

    In 2009, an abolition bill passed the House and was then amended in the Senate to create a study commission on the death penalty. Governor Lynch signed that bill and the commission met for a year and issued a report in December 2010.

    In April 2018, the House and Senate again voted to abolish the death penalty. Governor Chris Sununu has said he will veto the bill.
  • New Hampshire "firsts"

    For many years, New Hampshire had the most restrictive death penalty in the country.  It applied only in cases of homicide or treason.

    In 1834, New Hampshire's Governor Badger was one of the nation's first to call for abolition of the death penalty as part of the gallows movement.
  • Other interesting facts

    New Hampshire still retains a narrow death penalty statute, which only applies in six specific circumstances.
    • 630:1 Capital Murder. –
         I. A person is guilty of capital murder if he knowingly causes the death of:
            (a) A law enforcement officer or a judicial officer acting in the line of duty or when the death is caused as a consequence of or in retaliation for such person's actions in the line of duty;
            (b) Another before, after, while engaged in the commission of, or while attempting to commit kidnapping as that offense is defined in RSA 633:1;
            (c) Another by criminally soliciting a person to cause said death or after having been criminally solicited by another for his personal pecuniary gain;
            (d) Another after being sentenced to life imprisonment without parole pursuant to RSA 630:1-a, III;
            (e) Another before, after, while engaged in the commission of, or while attempting to commit aggravated felonious sexual assault as defined in RSA 632-A:2;
            (f) Another before, after, while engaged in the commission of, or while attempting to commit an offense punishable under RSA 318-B:26, I(a) or (b); or
            (g) Another, who is licensed or privileged to be within an occupied structure, or separately secured or occupied section thereof, before, after, or while in the commission of, or while attempting to commit, burglary as defined in RSA 635:1
  • New Hampshire does not currently have a death chamber. In 2010, the Department of Corrections estimated that building an execution chamber would cost about $1.7 million, but the legislature has not authorized funds to build it.
  • https://deathpenaltyinfo.org/new-hampshire-1

 

Suggestions/Feedback

Do you have a topic that you would like for us to discuss? A correction and additional piece of information that we may have overlooked, please send it in to freecastpodcast@gmail.com While you are here, follow us on Twitter @freecastpodcast and like our Facebook page.

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